Mijbil, as I called the otter, was, in fact, of a race previously unknown to science, and was at length christened by zoologists Lutrogale perspicillata maxwelli, or Maxwell’s otter. For the first twenty- four hours Mijbil was neither hostile nor friendly; he was simply aloof and indifferent, choosing to sleep on the floor as far from my bed as possible. The second night Mijbil came on to my bed in the small hours and remained asleep in the crook of my knees until the servant brought tea in the morning, and during the day he began to lose his apathy and take a keen, much too keen, interest in his surroundings. I made a body-belt for him and took him on a lead to the bathroom, where for half an hour he went wild with joy in the water, plunging and rolling in it, shooting up and down the length of the bathtub underwater, and making enough slosh and splash for a hippo. This, I was to learn, is a characteristic of otters; every drop of water must be, so to speak, extended and spread about the place; a bowl must at once be overturned, or, if it will not be overturned, be sat in and sploshed in until it overflows. Water must be kept on the move and made to do things; when static it is wasted and provoking.

Explanation:

 

The otter, which the author named Mijbil, actually belonged to a race that had not yet been discovered by science. Zoologists eventually gave it the name Lutrogale perspicillata maxwelli, or Maxwell's otter. Mijbil was neither aggressive nor friendly during the first twenty-four hours; instead, he was distant and uninterested, preferring to sleep on the floor as far away from the author's bed as he could. The next night, Mijbil climbed onto Mawell's bed in the wee hours and slept in the crook of the author's knees until the servant brought tea in the morning. However, by the next day, he had lost his complacency and was taking a great, perhaps even too keen, interest in his surroundings.

 

I fashioned a body belt for him and led him to the bathroom, where he spent a half-hour splashing and rolling around in the water, jumping up and down the length of the bathtub underwater, and making enough noise to drown a hippo. I later discovered that this is a trait shared by otters. Every drop of water must be, in a sense, expanded and dispersed across the area. A bowl must also be immediately turned upside down, or, if that is not possible, sat in and poured into until it is full. Water must be maintained moving and made to do tasks; when static, it is inefficient and upsetting.

 

Meanings of difficult words:

 
Sl. No
Words
Meanings
1
ValleyA low area of land between hills or mountains, typically with a river or stream flowing through it
2
CrestThe top of a mountain or hill
3
RipeHaving arrived at the fitting stage or time for a particular action or purpose
4
DownpourA heavy fall of rain
5
ShowerA brief and usually light fall of rain, hail, sleet, or snow
6
IntimatelyIn a way that involves detailed knowledge
Reference:

National Council of Educational Research and Training (2007). First Flight. Mijbil the Otter - Gavin Maxwell (pp. 102 - 110). Published at the Publication Division by the Secretary, National Council of Educational Research and Training, Sri Aurobindo Marg, New Delhi..