Theory:

In the previous theories, we have learnt what data is and how to collect and classify them.
 
In this session, we shall learn how to present the data.
Before editing the data, the data is collected and not used for any purpose; then, the data is called Raw data.
Range
The difference between the highest value and the smallest value in a set of data is the range.
Example:
Consider the following set of data \(2\), \(7\), \(8\), \(6\), \(10\), \(5\), \(6\), \(8\), \(2\)
 
The frequency distribution table will look like the following:
 
Number
Frequency
\(2\)
\(2\)
\(5\)
\(1\)
\(6\)
\(2\)
\(7\)
\(1\)
\(8\)
\(2\)
\(10\)
\(1\)
 
From the column 'Number', we know that the highest value is \(10\), and the smallest value is \(2\).
 
\(\text{Range} = \text{Highest value} - \text{Smallest value}\)
 
\(= 10 - 2\)
 
\(= 8\)
 
Therefore, the range of the given set of data is \(8\).
Frequency
The numerical representation of the number of times an entry repeats itself in that set of data.
Example:
Consider the above table, in which we can see the \(6\) is repeated \(2\) times.
 
Therefore, the frequency of \(6\) is \(2\).
 
Similarly, the frequency of \(10\) is \(1\).
 
The data can be presented using a frequency distribution table which we shall learn in the upcoming theories.