Theory:

Intersecting lines:
 
When two lines cross each other and share a common point is known as the Intersecting line.
 
output-onlinepngtools (17).png
 
The above figure shows intersecting lines \(AB\) and \(CD\). Where two-line \(AB\) and \(CD\) intersect at a common point ‘\(O\)’.
Example:
We can see that the pair of metal blades in the scissor intersecting at a common point. There are many other day-to-day examples of this concept.
output-onlinepngtools (15).png
 
Parallel lines:
 
When two lines are in the same plane and will never intersect each other is known as Parallel lines.
 
output-onlinepngtools (18).png
 
The above figure shows parallel lines \(AB\) and \(CD\). Where two lines \(AB\) and \(CD\) are in the same plane but will never intersect each other and hence are termed as parallel lines.
Example:
We can see that the garage shelf parallel to each other. There are many other day-to-day examples for this idea.
output-onlinepngtools (20).png
 
Concurrent lines:
 
When set of lines are said to be concurrent lines if they all intersect at the same point.
 
output-onlinepngtools (47).png
 
The above figure shows the concurrent lines \(AB\), \(CD\), \(PQ\) and \(RS\) because they all intersect at a single point \(O\). Thus, the concurrency of point is \(O\).
Example:
We can see that the orange pulps insect each other at a point \(P\). There are many other day to day examples of this idea.
 
output-onlinepngtools (3).png