PUMPA - THE SMART LEARNING APP

Take a 10 minutes test to understand your learning levels and get personalised training plan!

Download now on Google Play

Theory:

The pattern of rhymes at the ending of each line in a poem is called a rhyme scheme. Letters (A,B,C...) are usually used to express which lines rhyme. Verses that are designated with the same letter are said to rhyme with each other. It is also known as an arrangement of rhymes in a stanza or a poem.
Example:
For easier understanding of the concept, let us take a famous nursery rhyme, written by Jane Taylor as an example.
 
Twinkle twinkle little star,
How I wonder what you are.
Up above the world so high
Like a diamond in the sky.
 
We see that the first two lines rhyme with each other (star-are); the second two lines rhyme with each other (high-sky). Let us name each line as \(A\), \(B\) depending on the words that rhyme with each other.
 
Twinkle twinkle little star,
A
How I wonder what you are. A
Up above the world so high,B
Like a diamond in the sky. B
 
It can thus be seen that this poem follows \(AABB\) pattern.
Rhyme scheme of the poem "A Tiger in the Zoo":
He stalks in his vivid stripes\(A\)
The few steps of his cage,\(B\)
On pads of velvet quiet,\(C\)
In his quiet rage.\(B\)
 
He should be lurking in shadow, \(A\)
Sliding through long grass\(B\)
On pads of velvet quiet,\(C\)
Where plump deer pass.\(B\)
 
He should be snarling around houses
\(A\)
At the jungle’s edge,\(B\)
Baring his white fangs, his claws,\(C\)
Terrorising the village! \(B\)
 
But he’s locked in a concrete cell \(A\)
His strength behind bars,\(B\)
Stalking the length of his cage, \(C\)
Ignoring visitors. \(D\)
 
 He hears the last voice at night, \(A\)
The patrolling cars, \(B\)
And stares with his brilliant eyes\(C\)
At the brilliant stars.\(B\)