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Theory:

Alliteration is the occurrence of the same sound, if not a letter, at the starting of two or more words in a single line, in a poem.
1. The slender smiling girl.
2. The song of sweet birds.
3. Black bug bit a bear.
4. Practise the piano.
5. Feel the phone on your face.
What are the uses of alliteration?
 
1. It creates a rhythm, similar to rhyming words
2. It emphasizes the importance of phrases.
3. Mostly used in tongue-twisters.
Alliteration used in the poem "The Ball Poem":
What is the boy now, who has lost his ball,
What, what is he to do? I saw it go
Merrily bouncing, down the street, and then
Merrily over — there it is in the water!
No use to say ‘O there are other balls’:
An ultimate shaking grief fixes the boy
As he stands rigid, trembling, staring down
All his young days into the harbour where
His ball went. I would not intrude on him;
A dime, another ball, is worthless. Now
He senses first responsibility
In a world of possessions. People will take
Balls, balls will be lost always, little boy.
And no one buys a ball back. Money is external
He is learning, well behind his desperate eyes,
The epistemology of loss, how to stand up
Knowing what every man must one day know
And most know many days, how to stand up
 
~ JOHN BERRYMAN
Reference:
National Council of Educational Research and Training (2006). Beehive. The Ball Poem - John Berryman (pp. 46-47). Published at the Publication Division by the Secretary, National Council of Educational Research and Training, Sri Aurobindo Marg, New Delhi.