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Theory:

A relative clause is a subordinate clause which specifies or gives information about a person or thing. Relative clauses come after a noun or pronoun and, in English, often begin with a relative pronoun such as 'who', 'which', or 'that'.
A relative clause has a subject and a verb, but it is not a complete sentence. It's frequently referred to as an "adjective clause" since it operates similarly to an adjective in that it provides more information about a noun. A relative clause always opens with a “relative pronoun,” which replaces a noun, a noun phrase, or a pronoun when sentences are merged.
Types of relative clauses
There are two types of relative clauses. They are defining and non-defining.
Defining relative clause
Defining relative clauses are used to make clear which noun (person or thing) we are talking about.
Example:
  • Shakespeare is the man who created Romeo and Juliet.
  • This is the building which Ram built.
Feature 1: In this kind of relative clause, we can replace "who" or “which” with "that".
Example:
  • Shakespeare is the man that created Romeo and Juliet.
  • This is the building that Ram built.
Feature 2: We can leave out the pronoun if it is the object of the relative clause.
Example:
This is the building Ram built. (that is the object of built)
Non-defining relative clause
Non defining clauses are used to give more information about a person, thing or situation.
    Example:
  • Ramasamy, who is 74, has just retired.
  • I had a cup of tea and banana chips, which I always enjoy.
  • I met Abinaya in town yesterday, which was a nice surprise.
With this kind of relative clause, we use commas (,) to separate it from the rest of the sentence.
Important!
However, please note that the above features are not applicable here.
 
1. In this kind of relative clause, we cannot use that:
Example:
"Ramasamy, who is 74, has just retired" can't be written as "Ramasamy, that is 74, has just retired".

2. We can neither leave out the pronoun:
Example:
"I had a cup of tea and banana chips, which I always enjoy" can't be written as "I had a cup of tea and banana chips, I always enjoy".