If only Peggy would decide of her own accord to stop having fun with Wanda. Oh, well! Maddie ran her hand through her short blonde hair as though to push the uncomfortable thoughts away. What difference did it make? Slowly Maddie tore into bits the note she had started. She was Peggy’s best friend, and Peggy was the best-liked girl in the whole room. Peggy could not possibly do anything that was really wrong, she thought.
 
     As for Wanda, she was just some girl who lived up on Boggins Heights and stood alone in the school yard. She scarcely ever said anything to anybody. The only time she talked was in the school yard about her hundred dresses. Maddie remembered her telling about one of her dresses, pale blue with coloured trimmings. And she remembered another that was brilliant jungle green with a red sash. “You’d look like a Christmas tree in that,” the girls had said in pretended admiration.
 
     Thinking about Wanda and her hundred dresses all lined up in the closet, Maddie began to wonder who was going to win the drawing and colouring contest. For girls, this contest consisted of designing dresses and for boys, of designing motorboats. Probably Peggy would win the girls’ medal. Peggy drew better than anyone else in the room. At least, that’s what everybody thought. She could copy a picture in a magazine or some film star’s head so that you could almost tell who it was. Oh, Maddie was sure Peggy would win. Well, tomorrow the teacher was going to announce the winners. Then they’d know.
Explanation:
 
Maddie then thought that Peggy should think herself to stop making fun of Wanda. Maddie then "ran her hand through her hair" as a gesture to drive away all those thoughts. Then she thought that if she wrote a note to Peggy, what difference it would bring. So she tore the notes into small bits.
 
Peggy was the best friend of Maddie. Everyone in the class liked Peggy. Since Peggy was brilliant and beautiful, everyone liked her. Maddie then thought that as she was a bright girl, she would not do anything wrong. It means that she would only make fun of her and that she won't cross her limits like teasing more.

After Maddie had cleared her thoughts about confessing to Peggy, she started thinking about Wanda. She thought Wanda was just another girl living in Boggins Heights. She stood alone in the schoolyard without anyone accompanying her. The only thing she used to speak in the schoolyard was about the hundred dresses. Maddie then remembered Wanda telling about one of her pale blue dresses with coloured trimmings. Then she remembered another dress which was green coloured. The green resembled the colour of the jungle, and it was with a red sash. After hearing that, the girls made fun of her by saying that Wanda would look like a Christmas tree in that dress.

While Maddie was thinking about Wanda and her hundred dresses in the closet, she immediately remembered the contest. A drawing and colouring contest was going to happen in the school for boys and girls. Girls used to design dresses, and boys had to design motorboats. After thinking that, Maddie thought that Peggy would win the girl's medal. As we learnt earlier that Peggy was an intelligent girl, Maddie would have thought in such a way.

Peggy can draw attractively. She used to draw in a better way than anyone in the class. Then Maddie said that even everyone would agree with the same thought. Then she said that Peggy would draw the picture of a magazine or the film star's image the same way it appears. Almost while looking at the picture, anyone can guess whose face it was. Maddie was sure that Peggy would win the contest. She then thought that the teacher would announce the winner the next day, and everyone would come to know who the winner was.

 

Meanings of the difficult words:

 

S.No
Words
Meanings
1
Uncomfortable Causing or feeling slight pain or physical discomfort
2
Blonde With pale yellow or gold hair
3
Wonder To ask yourself questions or express a wish to know about something
4
Announce To make something known or tell people about something officially
Reference:
National Council of Educational Research and Training (2007). The Hundred Dresses I - Eleanor Estes (pp. 63 - 72). Published at the Publication Division by the Secretary, National Council of Educational Research and Training, Sri Aurobindo Marg, New Delhi.