Theory:

Don’t stare
Don’t point
Explanation:
 
Problems might not be created if the proper reason behind each phrase and when to apply them is conveyed to the child. Every child deserves to know the purpose of his own actions. Children tend to get excited about little things, as they easily notice them.
 
They find new things that interest them. A small firework on the sky, a free sticker for a cookie, or a cake shaped like a mermaid, anything can grab their attention. Unlike adults who keep running about in pursuit of materialistic things, children tend to adore the beauty around them. They may stare at the things that interest them. Childhood is also when the mind is curious and has a lot of doubts. The child can also stare at something he does not understand. Adults tend to stop the child from staring rather than quenching their curiosity or encouraging them to adore the beauty in the little things around them. This dims the ability to question in a child.
 
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Child staring at fireworks
 
When children see things that interest them or when they want to talk about something, they point their fingers at them. This is to specify their need to the adults. Sometimes when they talk about someone, pointing their fingers at them can cause trouble as it grabs the attention of people who they are talking about. They might misunderstand that the child is talking ill about them or might know that they are being pointed at. But children do not care about it as they are not conscious about other people watching or talking about them, like adults. They are asked not to point at anyone but are not taught how they are supposed to convey their needs and emotions. Rather than telling them what not to do, adults could teach children to replace bad behaviours with good ones.
 
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Child pointing fingers
 
Meaning of Difficult Words:
 
S.No
Words
Meaning
1
PursuitIn search of
2
MaterialisticThings that can be bought with money
3
QuenchingTo satisfy
Reference:
National Council of Educational Research and Training (2007). Honeycomb. Chivy: Michael Rosen(pp. 69-70). Published at the Publication Division by the Secretary, National Council of Educational Research and Training, Sri Aurobindo Marg, New Delhi.