Theory:

Diacope is a kind of repetition where the repeated words will have a word or few in between them.
Pronunciation Guide:
Diacope: Dia (as is Diana)-- co (as in code)-- pe (as in pin)
This kind of repetition is similar to epizeuxis. The difference is that: there is no break given to the repeated words in epizeuxis; but, on the other hand, the repeated words are separated by one or two words in the case of diacope.
 
Let us have some examples now!
 
The following is an extract from the poem "Fear No More" by William Shakespeare.
Example:
Fear no more the lightning-flash,
Nor the all-dreaded thunder-stone;
Fear not slander, censure rash;
Thou hast finished joy and moan:
All lovers young, all lovers must
Consign to thee, and come to dust.
In the poem, the phrase "all lovers" are repeated but with the word "young" in between them. So, the word young has separated the repeated words "all young". Without the words in between, the repetition would have become epizeuxis. However, due to the break, the repetition become diacope!
 
The following is an extract from Rabindranath Tagore's "Vocation".
Example:
When the gong sounds ten in the morning and
I walk to school by our lane,
Every day I meet the hawker crying,
Bangles, crystal bangles!”
The line "Bangles, crystal bangles" is an example of diacope. The word crystal has separated the repeated words bangles.
In diacope, the repeated words could be separated by more than one word. Sentences such as "I have it and I will not give it to you", "to be, or not to be", "she is a doctora sweet and compassionate doctor" are examples of diacope. In the above-given sentences, the number of words between the repeated words vary. There were \(3\) words in the first sentence, \(2\) words in the second sentence, and \(4\) in the third sentence.
Diacope used in the poem "The Shed":
There’s a shed at the bottom of our garden
With a spider’s web hanging across the door,
The hinges are rusty and creak in the wind.
When \(I\)’m in bed \(I\) lie and \(I\) listen,
I’ll open that door one day.
 
There’s a dusty old window around at the side
With three cracked panes of glass,
I often think there’s someone staring at me
Each time that I pass,
I’ll peep through that window one day.
 
My brother says there’s a ghost in the shed
Who hides under the rotten floorboards,
And if I ever dare to set foot inside
He’ll jump out and chop off my head,
But I’ll take a peek one day.
 
I know that there isn’t really a ghost,
My brother tells lies to keep the shed for his den;
There isn’t anyone staring or making strange noises
And the spider has been gone from his web
since I don’t know when,
I’ll go into that shed one day soon,
 
But not just yet...
The word 'I' is repeated thrice with a few words in between. Hence, it is an example of diacope.
    Reference:
  • National Council of Educational Research and Training (2006). Beehive. Fear No More-William Shakespeare (pp. 137). Published at the Publication Division by the Secretary, National Council of Educational Research and Training, Sri Aurobindo Marg, New Delhi.
  • National Council of Educational Research and Training (2006). Honeysuckle. Vocation-Rabindranath Tagore (pp. 109). Published at the Publication Division by the Secretary, National Council of Educational Research and Training, Sri Aurobindo Marg, New Delhi.
  • National Council of Educational Research and Training (2007). Honeycomb. The Shed: Frank Flynn (pp. 48 -49). Published at the Publication Division by the Secretary, National Council of Educational Research and Training, Sri Aurobindo Marg, New Delhi.