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Theory:

Hyperbole:
A hyperbole is a figure of speech that exaggerates a particular phrase in the poem. This exaggeration or overstatement makes something seem more exciting, dangerous, etc. It elevates the emotion that is conveyed.
  • One is never supposed to take hyperboles in the literal meaning.
  • It is used to emphasise on a particular statement.
  • It is mostly used when there is a necessity for grandeur.
  • Hyperboles are supposed to be obvious and deliberate, such that the reader understands that it is only used for emphasis.
  • It has to create an effect in the minds of the readers.
Example:
1. I could eat a horse now - It is not humanely possible to eat a whole horse, but it is just used to exaggerate the fact that the person is extremely hungry.
2. It is raining cats and dogs - It is a phrase to convey that it rained heavily as it is not literally possible to rain cats and dogs.
3. I am drowning in paperwork- It is not possible to drown in paper, but it conveys the extreme stress in the job.
Hyperbole from the poem 'The Secret of the Machines':
  • We are greater than the Peoples and the Kings - Machines cannot be greater than people and kings, and therefore it is a mere exaggeration.
 
 
Assonance:
Assonance is the effect created when two syllables in words that are close together have the same vowel sound, but different consonants, or the same consonants but different vowels.
  • Assonance between consonants is called consonance.
  • When two words rhyme, it is mostly assonance, as generally, it begins with the vowel sound of the last stressed syllable.
Example:
  1. That solitude which suits abstruser musings
  2. His tender heir might bear his memory
  3. On a proud round cloud in white high night
  4. The squeaky wheel gets the grease.
Assonance from the poem 'The Secret of the Machines':
  • Oil is all
  • Pull and push
  • Weave and heat
  • Fly and dive
 
 
Connotation:
Connotation is when a word has an implied meaning other than the direct meaning that it suggests. In poetry, the connotation sets the tone and mood and makes the readers interpret the meaning. Some words have positive connotations, and some have negative.
    Example:
  • He is such a pig - Here, the pig does not mean the person is literally the animal, rather it stands for the shabbiness.
  • She is such an angel - Here, the angel denotes the kind of person the woman is, indicating that she is sweet.
  • The pet is emaciated - Here, the pet is neglected by the owner.
  • He was feeling sad, sitting under the blue curtain - Here, the blue curtain indicates the melancholy of the person.
Connotations from the poem 'The Secret of the Machines':
  • Though our smoke may hide the Heavens from your eyes - The smoke refers to the machine's presence in the human world. Machines. Hiding the heavens refer to the distraction the machines cause for the humans, making them ignore the good things.