Theory:

We know that matter is made up of tiny particles; particles are constant and random. Lets us now see the difference between the states of matter. The following below are the \(3\) states of matter.
  • Solid
  • Liquid
  • Gases
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Characteristics of states of matter:
 
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Packing in states of matter
  
Solid:
  
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Solid
  • In solid, the molecules are closely packed with no space to move.
  • They have definite shape and volume.
  • Due to their arrangement, it has a strong intermolecular force and less intermolecular space.
Liquid:
  
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Liquid
  • In liquid, the molecules are loosely packed.
  • They don't have a definite shape but have a definite volume.
  • Due to their arrangement, they have less intermolecular force and more intermolecular space compared to solids.
Gases:
  
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Wind
  • In gases, the molecules are very loosely packed.
  • They don't have a definite shape and volume.
  • Due to their arrangement, it has a very weak intermolecular force and a very large intermolecular space.
States of matter
Example:
Let us see how does hot-air balloon manage to stay in the air:
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When a burner heats the air inside a hot-air balloon, it expands. The density of the air inside the balloon decreases as the balloon expands.
 
As a result, the density of the air inside the balloon is lower than that of the air outside the balloon.
 
The hot-air balloon will float because of the density difference.