As soon as the class had assembled, Miss Mason announced the winners. Jack Beggles had won for the boys, she said, and his design for an outboard motor was on exhibition in Room Twelve, along with the sketches by all the other boys.
 
     “As for the girls,” she said, “although just one or two sketches were submitted by most, one girl — and Room Thirteen should be proud of her — this one girl actually drew one hundred designs — all different and all beautiful. In the opinion of the judges, any one of the drawings is worthy of winning the prize. I am very happy to say that Wanda Petronski is the winner of the girls’ medal. Unfortunately, Wanda has been absent from school for some days and is not here to receive the applause that is due to her. Let us hope she will be back tomorrow. Now class, you may file around the room quietly and look at her exquisite drawings.”
 
     The children burst into applause, and even the boys were glad to have a chance to stamp on the floor, put their fingers in their mouths and whistle, though they were not interested in dresses.
 
     “Look, Peg,” whispered Maddie. “There’s that blue one she told us about. Isn’t it beautiful?”
 
     “Yes,” said Peggy, “And here’s that green one. Boy, and I thought I could draw.”
Explanation:
 
The teacher announced the contest winners when the students assembled in the classroom. She announced that Jack Beagles had won on the boy's side. He had drawn an outboard motor. The drawing was kept on exhibition in Room Twelve, along with the drawings of other boys.

Then the teacher started telling about who won the prize on the girl's side. She said that most of the girls submitted one or two sketches. Then she added that only one girl from Room Thirteen designed hundreds of designs. Also, she said she was proud of that girl because all the designs seemed different and beautiful. The teacher then said that the judges believed that any of the drawings deserved the award. She said that she was very happy to announce that the winner of the girl's medal was Wanda Petronski.
 
YCIND_220815_4288_Kids clapping (1).png
Children clapped their hands in excitement

After telling them that, the teacher said that, unfortunately, Wanda had been absent from school for some days. In addition, she said that she was not here to get this applause and she meant that the competition won because of her. Then she asked everyone that let them hope that she would be back to school tomorrow. Then the teacher asked the children to roam around the class in line to explore the extraordinary drawings. After hearing that, the children felt happy and started clapping their hands. The boys were glad they got the chance to stamp on the floor, put their fingers in their mouths, and whistle. Usually, these things won't happen on ordinary days. Due to the competition and the prize, the teacher made them enjoy their day. Since the boys were not interested in looking at the dresses, they enjoyed their day by stamping on the floor and putting their fingers in their mouths, and they whistled at each other.

Later, Maddie asked Peggy to look at the blue dress, which she told them. Then she asked her whether it looked beautiful. After hearing that, Peggy replied that yes, it seemed beautiful. Then she said there was a green colour dress. Then Peggy said, "Boy, and I thought I could draw." Here, a boy is denoted as an expression. It means, Oh man, or oh dude. Here Peggy tries to say that she thought of drawing that green coloured dress which Wanda drew.
 
Meanings of the difficult words:
 
S.No
Words
Meanings
1
Worthy Having or showing the qualities that deserve the specified action or regard
2
PrizeA thing given as a reward to the winner of a competition or in recognition of an outstanding achievement
3
MedalA small metal disc, with words or a picture on it, given as a reward for a brave action, for winning a competition, or to remember a special event
4
ApplauseApproval or praise expressed by clapping
5
WinnerA person or thing that wins something
Reference:
National Council of Educational Research and Training (2007). The Hundred Dresses I - Eleanor Estes (pp. 63 - 72). Published at the Publication Division by the Secretary, National Council of Educational Research and Training, Sri Aurobindo Marg, New Delhi.