Theory:

The process of breeding and rearing fishes in ponds, dams(reservoirs), lakes, rivers and paddy fields is called pisciculture.
Pisciculture is the farming of economically important fish under controlled conditions.
Types of Pisciculture:
1. Extensive fish culture:
 
The culture of fishes in large areas having low stocking density and natural feeding is known as extensive fish culture.
 
2. Intensive fish culture:
 
The culture of fishes in small areas having high stocking density and providing artificial feed to increase production is known as intensive fish culture.
 
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Fish culture
 
3. Monoculture:
 
It is a type of fish culture in which a single type of fish is cultivated in a water body. Hence, it is also known as mono species culture.
 
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Monoculture
 
4. Polyculture:
 
The type of fish culture in which more than one type of fish is cultivated in a water body. Hence, it is also known as composite fish culture.
 
5. Integrated fish farming:
 
It is a culture in which animal husbandry is performed along with crops. It is the rearing fish along with paddy, poultry, cattle, pig and ducks.
 
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Integrated fish farming
CMFRI and CIBA:
\(CMFRI\): The Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute (CMFRI) was established by the Government of India in \(1947\) at Cochin, Kerala. The main aim of this institute is to focus on the marine fisheries landings, to carry out research on taxonomy and bioeconomic characteristics of marine organisms.
 
\(CIBA\): The Central Institute of Brackish Water Aquaculture (CIBA), established in \(1987\), has its headquarters in Chennai. This institute aims to manage sustainable culture system for finfish and shellfish in brackish water. It also assists small aquafarmers in finfish and shrimp farming by providing sustainable modern technologies.
Reference:
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